Tag Archives: tips

Giving feedback

Feedback sheets

For the supervisor, feedback is perhaps the most difficult aspect of the whole supervision process. The intention of feedback is to enable the recipient to benefit from critically helpful comments and suggestions, but a balance is often difficult to find. To put it simply, the supervisor wants to provide the student with helpful advice to enable the student to improve their performance, but to stop short of actually doing the work for the student. Viewed in this context, any feedback should consist of three parts; a note of what the student has done well; the identification of what can be improved; and suggestions for making these improvements. It is not sufficient to say that, “Your citations are terrible” without explaining how they can be improved. Simply listing the faults can be demoralising and is not sufficiently helpful for learning. Personally, I am not a big fan of the trend to include a “Feed-forward” paragraph, because I belong to the tradition that good feedback always includes within the commentary some instructions on how to make future work even better, so the need for a separate “feed-forward” section is redundant.

That is the broad context, but the level of detail that a student can expect to receive, and the timeliness of such feedback, can be very much case-by-case, and diverse according to different supervisors. When I receive the first pieces of writing from a student, as they complete drafts of individual chapters, I like to give a detailed root-and-branch response. Normally I do this by using track-changes, to insert every missing comma, correct spelling or clumsy grammar, and place annotations in the margin to query or compliment relevant sentences and diagrams. I appreciate that not every supervisor considers this to be part of their role, but I take the view that it is my job to set the benchmark of quality for the student in the presentation of their dissertation. To do this, I can only give them an idea of the standard of writing that I personally would be comfortable with if this was my own presentation. I do not tell the student what to write, but I encourage them by example to present this in the best and most appropriate manner. I work on the (possibly naïve) idea that every student wants to exert themselves to the highest standards possible, and therefore when I make suggestions on how to improve the work, these suggestions are made with the best intention to benefit the student. I leave the decision on whether or not to accept my changes and comments to the wisdom of the student. If s/he feels that their original version is better, that is their decision, but if the External Examiner demands the same changes that I have suggested, I know that it is not because the student has not been given that advice by me, merely that they have not chosen to heed it.

Timing is another variable issue. At my current university we are required that “normally” (a wonderful word) we are expected to return feedback to students within ten working days of the submission deadline, and I think this is fair. The purpose, after all, of feedback is to help the student to improve their future work, and this is best done while the submitted work is relatively fresh in their memory, and before the student starts make similar mistakes in the next piece of work to be submitted for assessment. In practice, with research students, ongoing feedback can be given in a variety of ways – written or verbal – using a diversity of media, including text, telephone support, chats in the corridor, and formal sessions either face-to-face or using video-chat. It is wise to explore very early in the supervision process what works best for the individual student and the individual supervisor.

Setting the tone of academic writing

Evaluation

There is a lot of nonsense talked about “academic writing” in some circles. A central myth is that it needs to be “complex”. In fact, exactly the reverse is the case! In writing an academic text, the author needs to be aware of some of the same key issues as any author, whether the writing is fact or fiction, science or humanities. Firstly, the text needs to convey information to the readership. Even complex ideas and intricate research can be conveyed as a story which captivates the reader’s attention and (hopefully) helps their understanding. So good academic writing is not simply about the message, it is also, to some extent, about the style. A well-written chapter or article will be a pleasure to read and will stimulate the interest of the reader, even if they may not follow (or even agree with) everything that you claim. For this reason, it is just as important to pay close attention to spelling, grammar, and the structure of an academic article as it is for a good piece of journalism.

An academic article requires another couple of essentials, however, and these are ‘evidence’ and ‘analysis’. The main reason for writing an academic article (or PhD chapter) is to make known to the readership some new ideas – perhaps the results of a new experiment (or the confirmation by repetition of an earlier experiment) or perhaps simply bringing together scattered information to present a new way of thinking about the topic. Either way, the ‘story’ that is written will probably build upon earlier work, perhaps quoting some examples, or statistics, attempting to construct a picture of how the new information was obtained. In this synthesis, it is imperative that the writer identifies the sources of evidence which are being referred to – even in passing – in the construction of the storyline. This sometimes gives academic writing a bit of a staccato appearance, with frequent interruptions e.g. (Rennie and Smyth, 2017) to the flow of sentences that would be the norm for a non-academic article. Nevertheless, these citations to the sources of evidence are absolutely essential in order to place the new piece of writing within the context of what is already known about the topic. Remember, the purpose of research, and the PhD in particular, is to make an original contribution to knowledge, by extending what is known into an area which is less well known, and by definition extending the sum total of our knowledge of the discipline. There are different conventions on how to draw attention to the sources of evidence which are used  to give support, reliability, confidence, to the new ideas being expressed, and these citation styles – such as Harvard, Vancouver, APA – will vary with different academic disciplines. Students should check with their supervisors on what is most appropriate (sometimes the required styles will vary between different journals).

With respect to the ‘analysis’ component of the writing, this will vary between different academic levels, and occasionally even within the same piece of academic work. For instance, early-stage undergraduates may be allowed to be more descriptive in their writing, but late-stage undergraduates are expected to be more highly analytical, rather than purely descriptive. By the stage of embarking on a research degree, the student is expected to understand the importance of critical analysis, (and practice it) so that although a literature review chapter may in broad terms describe the state of current knowledge about the research topic, the reviews of the individual sources of evidence should not be solely descriptive, and should critically evaluate the strengths and possible weaknesses of the source publications.

For this reason, I try to give a particularly thorough feedback on the early work of any research student that I am supervising. I use “track changes” to comment on every missing comma, typographic error, lack of citation, or inappropriate style format. If the supervisor can quickly and clearly set the tone required for the relevant level of the student’s work, a benchmark can be established, and thereafter the student should be clear about the quality, style, conventions, and expectations required for the final product. At least, that is the theory…

Getting research ethics approval

waysigns

Once the research question(s) and the probable method(s) of gathering new data have been established, the next stage in any research process is to ensure that the following stage(s) of the research project will be ethically appropriate for the task(s) in hand. In actual fact, the ethical considerations will have been made at a general level much earlier in the research planning, but it is only now, when there is a greater certainty about the methodology and the details of the data-gathering methods, that the researcher will be sure of the complete nature of the ethical issues which might be involved in the research.

It is not uncommon at this stage for researchers, especially novice researchers, to declare that their particular research project “does not really have any ethical issues”. This is almost always untrue. Whether it is a simple survey with a clipboard and pen, or a more complex set of interviews, questionnaires or focus groups, there will always be issues relating to the nature of the information intended to be gathered, from whom it will be gathered, or how the subsequent data might be stored and made available to other people. Research projects involving patients, animals, children, or vulnerable adults will require especially stringent ethical codes of practice. Laboratory experiments, fieldwork, or simply re-working the data already gathered by a previous researcher, will all have their own distinct and necessary ethical guidelines to consider. At the very, very least, there are ethical questions which need to be considered about who is funding the research, who decides what research gets a priority, and what do the funding organisations receive in return for their financial support?

The supervisor has a crucial role in talking through with the student all of the possible ethical issues which might impact upon the research. Frequently, the ethical issues can be resolved very easily, and the research can proceed, but the simple fact of working through the range possible issues which might arise, and sharing experience on how they can be satisfactorily dealt with, is an important part of the professional training required by the student.

Every university, and most professional associations which come into contact with research, will have codes of conduct and formal procedures for scrutinising and approving research ethics proposals for research projects with which they are involved. This will require specific application forms, a scrutinising committee, and a formal code of research behaviour with which researchers are required to conform. Some procedures to gain ethical approval for research are particularly detailed, for example anything requiring contact with the health service, such as patient notes, contact with patients, or any engagement with either health staff or medical procedures, is likely to involve substantial detail and very careful research design.

Key concerns in all research ethics matters are to avoid causing harm, to respect confidentiality, and to maintain high standards of moral integrity. The latter, for instance, might refer to a very wide range of “common sense” standards such as to refrain from cheating, plagiarism, falsifying results, vested interests, and so on. Though they may seem “common sense” to most of us, we tend to forget that many of these issues are perceived differently by different cultures, and influenced by pressures which might be applied – internal and external to the institution – to “encourage” researchers to produce favourable results one way or another. It is for these reasons that gaining the approval of the research ethics committee is a fundamental gateway for any research project before it can be seriously undertaken.

The things other people say…

Some light-hearted relief over the summer months, and still on the topic of PhD supervision, here are a few blogs that are worth dipping into:

Get a Life, PhD (just what it says!) http://getalifephd.blogspot.co.uk/

The Thesis Whisperer (source of lots of good advice) https://thesiswhisperer.com/

Good, practical tips (from someone who has been through it) http://jameshaytonphd.com/everything/

And, last but not least, just to illustrate that there is always someone worse off than yourself, take a look at these comments which academics have had from reviewers of their article submissions. Some of them are very, very funny… https://twitter.com/YourPaperSucks