Interpreting the data

building

Building on existing knowledge

A key role of any supervisor is helping the research student to bridge the gap between the fundamentals about what is currently known about the research topic, and the new results which have been generated through the research activities of the student. All research is built upon some level of pre-existing knowledge on the subject, even if existing knowledge is patchy or otherwise insubstantial. In the literature review chapter, the student will have built up the profile on what is already known about the research topic and how that information can be backed-up by evidence from the academic literature available. In the analysis chapter, the first task is to provide some interpretation for the new, primary research conducted by the student, but a significant secondary task is to relate this back to the previously discussed evidence and underpinning theories which were explained in the earlier chapter(s). This can be a tricky task because the new research results might either fully support earlier work (in which case, what’s new about the research?) or else directly contradict it (in which case how do you prove the superiority of the new results?).

It is a useful tip to bear in mind that hindsight is a wonderful perspective, so try to avoid feeling too smug about the wonderful flashes of insight produced by the new research. Always assume (unless proven otherwise beyond doubt) that the earlier researchers did the best job that they could with the information, equipment, and currency of information at the time they were doing their research. It is easy to look back in history and wonder why our predecessors could ever have believed some of the accepted wisdom and “common sense” of the time, but in fact we are no different: we simply have much more information in a greater level of detail, but it would be a fool or a knave who would claim to know every last thing about the chosen subject. In most circumstances the research will both tweak prior definitions, and then throw clearer light on an existing area or understanding, or it will provide new data to enable the researcher to propose a new way of thinking about the existing data and justifying that new approach by producing new evidence (or a new way of interpreting the existing evidence).

Either way, the first stage of research analysis is to compare the new information with what has already been understood, and then go beyond this to open up a new area that is worthy of further research (and/or a proposing a different way of understanding the subject). Two common failings at this stage of the research process are either to appear to present the conclusions as if nothing important had ever preceded the current research (thereby inventing a whole new branch of epistemology) or else failing to restrict the conclusions to the actual results of the current research and instead attempting to make grand conclusions for the whole of the discipline (rather than just for the current research project). Either way, getting to grips to understand the importance of the new research, and using it to build upon earlier research results to improve our knowledge of the subject, is a fundamental step in the dissertation.

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