Starting to get results – Building the picture

Ch5

Take a step backwards. Perhaps the most confusing part of any research project is when some results start to emerge – but this is also one of the most exciting stages. There are three main reactions to the early arrival of research data; firstly, delight that results are finally coming through, as evidence that progress is being made; secondly anxiety that the “correct” information is emerging; thirdly trepidation, if not outright confusion, in attempting to make some sense of the results. All of this happens in quick succession, perhaps even all at once! Hopefully, the cautionary approach to the main data-gathering phase by way of a short pilot study should at least give the research student some confidence that the right research questions were being asked. There may remain doubts that enough data has been gathered – enough interviews generated, enough experiments conducted, enough field investigations made – but the answer to this question will only appear when the research study runs its full course. Despite the temptation to gather AS MUCH data as possible, the experienced supervisor will caution the research student of two hidden dangers that lie in the shallows. One is to remember that gathering the data is only the first part of the story, and the more that is gathered the more there is to be recorded, collated, analysed, interpreted, archived, and all the other ancillary tasks that need to be accomplished in order to secure a robust research project. Secondly, is to recognise the obvious, but often neglected, reality that the quality of the data collected is much more important that the quantity. Gathering a huge mass of data is not much good if the wrong questions have been asked, if important considerations have been missed, or mistaken assumptions made at the earlier stages.

Assuming that the methodology is appropriate, and that the data-gathering methods were systematic, robust, and effective, then every researcher – whether engaged on a small project or a mammoth one – is faced with the same question. “So what does it all mean?” There often comes a natural limit when collecting research data – a point at which it becomes apparent that simply collecting more and more data is not going to substantially change the conclusions. A point of diminishing returns on effort expended. At this point, the “So what?” factor kicks in. It might be necessary to back-track and do some fine-tuning, perhaps to look at some small specific areas in greater detail, or to conduct some follow-up research to fill in some gaps. Perhaps there is a need to explore some adjacent research questions which are tangential to the main research question, but will hopefully provide a better context in which to consider it. Sometimes it helps to simply present the results, devoid of attempts at interpretation, to a few trusted colleagues such as supervisors, to obtain some feedback and get some reassurance on “Do these findings make any sense?” Or perhaps it is time to draw the data-gathering to a halt – even temporarily – and begin to re-assemble the results to piece together what pictures emerge. This is the time when simply getting all the research results down in a systematic, logical, readable form is the main task, and hopefully this will provide a new platform to analyse what the results actually mean.

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