Editing – deciding what to keep

edits

Deciding what actually needs to be in the final version of the text in a dissertation or a journal paper can be a tough job. Some people do revision after revision, chopping and changing, cutting and adding, re-working the text until they are satisfied. Others (and I am one of them) usually think the subject through, then write the complete text straight off, only making minor changes later before submitting the final version. Whatever way works best for the author is the correct approach. The most important thing to remember is that whatever topic, the dissertation should tell a logical story to the reader. The role of the supervisor is often crucial at this stage, because the writer can frequently get so immersed in the subject matter that it can be difficult to see the wood for the trees. At worst, the writer wants to include everything that they know about the topic – just to be on the safe side. At the other extreme, the writer assumes that the readers understand how they are thinking, and tends to skip on the details, leading to ambiguity or misunderstanding by the readership. Having a “fresh pair of eyes” read over the text can be of immense value – whether it is a friend, a partner, or a supervisor, just having a colleague giving an unbiased view can help to iron out any possible areas for future confusion. Listen to them, and try not to be too defensive: if they have the courage to question you, listen to their opinions. Try not to be pedantic – verbosity and clarity rarely go well together – so consider carefully if your sentence actually contributes towards understanding the text, or is it just padding?

Usually, when writing something as chunky as a 100,000 word PhD dissertation, I would advise that each chapter or section should be drafted, then parked, until the general structure of the full text becomes more clear. Before starting to write the final chapter – the conclusions and any recommendations of the research – the author should pause, go back to the very start of the text, and re-read everything that they have written – making final amendments. Constructing complex narratives, such as dissertations or academic articles, need not be written in a completely linear fashion (i.e. from page one all the way through to the end) so re-visiting the advance draft gives an opportunity to shift paragraphs around, or add/delete information, and generally tidy up the text. This is also a good time to check that all the relevant citations to referenced evidence are included, as well as inserting accurate place-holders for tables, diagrams, and images. The advantage of pausing before starting the last chapter and finalising the earlier text, is that the “story” of the narrative is now fresh in the memory (it may have been a very long time since the author wrote the first few paragraphs of the dissertation). Basically, it is in the best interests of the writer that any readers can follow clearly and understandably the points that are being made. Spelling errors, overly-long sentences, clumsy wording, ambiguous statements, and a lack of referenced evidence all serve to make it more difficult for the reader to understand, and ultimately this reflects badly on the appreciation of the text. A happy reader means a happy examiner, and a better chance that the work will be more widely read and esteemed.

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