What methods will help to answer the research question?

Ch12

This is where it gets hard, not simply because the research student is venturing out into the unknown, but also because selecting the methods through which the research will be conducted will differ hugely between cultures, between disciplines, and between subjects within disciplines. There is no one-size-fits-all template which will allow a pick-and-choose approach to selecting the most appropriate methods. In one sense, this is an easy step, because it will probably be pretty obvious from the outset what methods will be needed in order to answer the research question(s). Almost all academic research methods will involve reading, either to follow-up on what has already been said about the topic or to put it into a wider context. After that, the methods might include interviews, experiments, observations, questionnaires, focus groups, and a host of other activities which will change in emphasis from discipline to discipline. Getting the “correct” mixture of these methods is what will determine the methodology, that is, the system of methods for further research.

Here is where high technology can come in. I say “high” technology because even using a pen-and-paper or driving a car to conduct an interview is using technology, but of course we generally mean computer-based technology. In educational circles you will frequently hear the assertion that “the technology should never lead!”. This is certainly true, to an extent, but not entirely. For instance, if there are two (or more) ways to record research data, and one way entails using a high-technology solution which makes it easier, more flexible and/or more secure, then surely most sensible people would vote for the use of the technology. Examples might include, the use of RefME to compile the dissertation reference list and store it on the cloud; using Mendeley to store the articles online; the use of SurveyMonkey to conduct a questionnaire online rather than face-to-face, giving time-flexibility, wider geographic coverage, and the ability to utilise automatic data analysis and presentation tools; the use of a free voice-recorder smartphone app to record interviews… The list could go on and on.

A crucial factor in all of this is to consider carefully – right at the start – how these methods will allow you to analyse and hopefully make sense of the data which will be gathered. It makes little sense jumping off a high-point without knowing, even approximately, where you might land. Similarly, it makes little sense to gather mountains of data without any ideas how to begin to make sense of it. The supervisor should be able to give some clear directions, but ultimately each situation, each carefully worded question, is slightly different, and will have different constraints on time, resources, and abilities, so the student will need to be fully comfortable with the methodology before even starting the research. Prior studies in a similar area can help to provide some direction, but the precise mixture needs to be decided for each individual research project.

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